Holy Cross College in Bury unveils expansion plans

First published in News

HOLY Cross College in Bury has applied for permission to build an extension which would create six new classrooms.

The plans include the creation of a three-storey extension to the college’s Mary Kelly building, providing six new teaching spaces, four office areas, and a study and learning space for students, which will be built on the site of a car park.

The work will also include a link corridor between the Mary Kelly and Marie Therese buildings, which will contain one of the classrooms.

Planning documents stated that the work, on the corner of Manchester Road and Wellington Road, will create more IT facilities on the first floor, as well as increased library and study facilities on the second floor.

The extension on the car park would mean 13 parking spaces would be lost, but these would be offset by the removal of metal containers which are currently taking up parking spaces.

The college reported that two new staff will be taken on as a result of the expansion, and that pupil intake will increase by 50.

The deadline for submissions to the plans is June 25, and the council hopes to make a decision by August 29.

Comments (2)

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8:12am Fri 13 Jun 14

sense2 says...

Not yet more many being spent on school buildings. In a time when everything else seems to getting cut back money continues to seem to be no object with schemes like this. A complete freeze on anything but essential maintenance should be put in place for a couple of years and these monies spent on other things that are being neglected. Not all tax payers have children attending school and they would like to see money spent in other directions for a change.
Not yet more many being spent on school buildings. In a time when everything else seems to getting cut back money continues to seem to be no object with schemes like this. A complete freeze on anything but essential maintenance should be put in place for a couple of years and these monies spent on other things that are being neglected. Not all tax payers have children attending school and they would like to see money spent in other directions for a change. sense2
  • Score: -10

9:42am Sat 14 Jun 14

Sarah Lapsley says...

Firstly, you do realise Education has been suffering cuts too? The place I work is falling apart because, as you say, there is only money for essential maintenance.

Second, investing in education is one of the proven ways of improving your economy long-term. These people will then pay more tax in future, because they are capable of earning more.

Thirdly, for each extra pupil a school/college takes on they get extra money from the area where the student lives. These students may have gone outside of bury otherwise, so actually it brings money into the area. If you want to make sure people from Bury have a chance at getting into the best unis, getting the best jobs you need to give them opportunities.

The argument "well, why should I pay for it, I don't use it" is at best selfish. We all contribute to a pot and essentials come out of it. Education is essential. I've not been to the doctor for a decade, but still think we should fund it because 1) I might need it one day, 2) I have needed it in the past, 3) people who can't afford treatment need it. You can apply the same logic to education.
Firstly, you do realise Education has been suffering cuts too? The place I work is falling apart because, as you say, there is only money for essential maintenance. Second, investing in education is one of the proven ways of improving your economy long-term. These people will then pay more tax in future, because they are capable of earning more. Thirdly, for each extra pupil a school/college takes on they get extra money from the area where the student lives. These students may have gone outside of bury otherwise, so actually it brings money into the area. If you want to make sure people from Bury have a chance at getting into the best unis, getting the best jobs you need to give them opportunities. The argument "well, why should I pay for it, I don't use it" is at best selfish. We all contribute to a pot and essentials come out of it. Education is essential. I've not been to the doctor for a decade, but still think we should fund it because 1) I might need it one day, 2) I have needed it in the past, 3) people who can't afford treatment need it. You can apply the same logic to education. Sarah Lapsley
  • Score: 8

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